rhamphotheca

scienceyoucanlove:

Happy Birthday Patrick the Wombat! This 29 year old is the world’s oldest living wombat (living currently at the Ballarat Wildlife Park in Australia). Given that Patrick has never had children, or any partners in general, probably makes him the oldest living wombat virgin as well! Congrats mate!

Wow, that is HUGE.

rhamphotheca
jadafitch:

Passenger Pigeons (Ectopistes migratorius)
This September is the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the Passenger Pigeon.In the nineteenth century, the Passenger Pigeon was one of the most common birds in the world.  There are records of flocks that stretched a mile long and contained billions of birds.  By the early twentieth century though, they were nearly extinct.  After European settlers arrived, much of their habitat was destroyed, and they were exploited as an inexpensive food source.  By the time it was understood that the Passenger Pigeon needed protection, it was too late.  Martha, the very last one died one hundred years ago, on September 1st 1914.  The loss of this beautiful bird gained public’s attention, which resulted in many new conservation and protection law and practices. 

jadafitch:

Passenger Pigeons (Ectopistes migratorius)

This September is the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the Passenger Pigeon.

In the nineteenth century, the Passenger Pigeon was one of the most common birds in the world.  There are records of flocks that stretched a mile long and contained billions of birds.  By the early twentieth century though, they were nearly extinct.  After European settlers arrived, much of their habitat was destroyed, and they were exploited as an inexpensive food source.  By the time it was understood that the Passenger Pigeon needed protection, it was too late.  Martha, the very last one died one hundred years ago, on September 1st 1914.  The loss of this beautiful bird gained public’s attention, which resulted in many new conservation and protection law and practices. 

rhamphotheca

libutron:

Common European Cockchafer - Melolontha melolontha

Also referred to as Maybug and Field Cockchafer, Melolontha melolontha (Coleoptera - Scarabaeidae) is a common inhabitant on agricultural lands throughout temperate Europe and the United States.

Males Common European Cockchafers have longer antennae than females, with a large, fan-like club protruding.

Cockchafers are among the most dreaded insect pests in many European countries, causing economic losses in agriculture, horticulture and forestry. In forests of south-western Germany, populations of the Forest Cockchafer (Melolontha hippocastani) and also the Field Cockchafer (M. melolontha) have been increasing during the past three decades and, therefore, monitoring of these populations has been intensified.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Armando Caldas | Locality: Cabreira, Vendas Novas, Portugal, 2010] - [Bottom: ©rockwolf | Locality: Venus Pool, Shropshire, West Midlands, England, 2012]